Monthly archives: March, 2024

Technique for Combining Continuum and Emission Wavelength Data in Astrophotography

by Dean Ashton, April 2024 There are many examples where we image an object that is predominantly a full continuumspectrum object, a galaxy or a reflection nebula for example, but it also contains emissionline nebulae components. Capturing both a full spectrum RGB image and narrowbandemission image which are then combined may reveal more information about the objectand create a more interesting and complete image. With so many new advances in Pixinsight processing methods, one…


Sun & Stars: 20, April – Carnewas

The first of this years Sun & Stars events. The event, as always, is dependant on clear skies, but this evening we hope to be able to see sunspot activityon the surface of the Sun and maybe a brief look at Jupiter as they both set in the western sky. The Moon will be full as it rises in the east, which is not ideal, but will still allow us to observe some interesting…


Collision Course – Brace for Impact!

You will probably have heard of the Hubble Space Telescope. It has orbited our planet 333 miles up since 1990 and has spectacularly opened up our view of the Universe with many beautiful images and discoveries. It was named after the American astronomer Edwin Hubble. He fought in the Great War and when he returned in 1919, Hubble joined the Mount Wilson Observatory with its 100-inch mirror Hooker Telescope that was the most powerful…


NGC1976 – Messier 42 & Sh2-279

Image taken my one of our club members – Ross Biddle The Orion Nebula M42- is probably one of the most photographed deep-space astronomical objects. It is one of the closest major star-forming regions and probably includes 6+ stellar giant type O and A stars. These are the biggest types of main and pre-main sequence stars and are extremely active and short-lived. M42 is about 1340 light years away and 24 light years across….


Next Meeting: March 21st – Summercourt

Image Credit: US Airforce Dan’s talk will be on Aurora. He will start with what the aurora actually are , i.e. the reactions with charged particles with different elements in the atmosphere and how the magnetosphere channels them. He’ll  then move onto solar events that release them and why they like equinoxes. He’ll also describe how other phenomena, that look like aurora, are formed.  We meet at 19:00 for a 19:30 kickoff


Largest Sunspot Group of Cycle 25

Last month ( February) solar observers had a real treat observing the largest Sunspot group of the current solar cycle No25 . Peter Meadows of the BAA Solar section wrote “In addition to producing 3 X-flares over the last day or so, sunspot group AR 13590 is also the largest of this cycle so far. Today (23rd Feb) it reached an area of 1800 millionths of the Sun’s visible hemisphere (MSH). It is an…